President Wrestles with Emancipation in Missouri

June 22, 1863

President Lincoln writes General John M. Schofield, military commander of Missouri: “Your despatch, asking in substance, whether, in case Missouri shall adopt gradual emancipation, the general government will protect slave owners in that species of property during the short time it shall be permitted by the State to exist within it, has been received. Desirous as I am, that emancipation shall be adopted by Missouri, and believing as I do, that gradual can be made better than immediate for both black and white, except when military necessity changes the case, my impulse is to say that such protection would be given. I can not know exactly what shape an act of emancipation may take. If the period from the initiation to the final end, should be comparatively short, and the act should prevent persons being sold, during that period, into more lasting slavery, the whole would be easier. I do not wish to pledge the general government to the affirmative support of even temporary slavery, beyond what can be fairly claimed under the constitution. I suppose, however, this is not desired; but that it is desired for the Military force of the United States, while in Missouri, to not be used in subverting the temporarily reserved legal rights in slaves during the progress of emancipation. This I would desire also. I have very earnestly urged the slave-states to adopt emancipation; and it ought to be, and is an object with me not to overthrow, or thwart what any of them may in good faith do, to that end.  You are therefore authorized to act in the spirit of this letter, in conjunction with what may appear to be the military necessities of your Department.”

President Lincoln writes Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton: “Do you not remember the french officer, Col. Duffie, whom we saw at Gen. McDowell’s Head Quarters near Fredericksburg, last May a year ago? I rem[em]ber he was then well spoken of. On the night of the 17th. Ist. he was surrounded by Stuart’s cavalry near Millersburg, and cut his way out with proportionate heavy loss to his then small command. Please see and hear him. I think you have strong recommendations on file in his behalf.”

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Published in: on June 22, 2013 at 9:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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